Lapis Lazuli riipus Afghanistanin Badaksanista

Lapis Lazuli riipus Afghanistanin Badaksanista

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Lapis lazuli or azure stone is an opaque semi-precious stone with an intense azure blue color. It is not a mineral but a rock, because it consists of more than one component. It is mainly mined in Afghanistan. The main component of lapis lazuli is lazurite (25% to 40%), a feldspar substitute with the chemical formula (Na, Ca) 8 (AlSiO4) 6 (S, SO4, Cl) 1-2. [1] Other important components are: calcite (white), sodalite (blue) and pyrite (yellow - metallic shiny). Furthermore, the minerals augite, diopside, enstatite, micas, hauynite, hornblende, geyerite (a sulfur-rich variety of lollinite) and nosane can also occur in lapis lazuli. Lapis lazuli is not particularly hard for a gemstone. On the Mohs scale, the hardness is 5.5, which means that the stone can be easily scratched by harder gemstones. It is therefore not wise to store lapis lazuli jewelery together with harder gemstones. Lapis lazuli is given spiritual power by alternative healers. Lapis lazuli is usually created by contact metamorphosis in crystalline marble. Lapis lazuli has been known since ancient times. In the city of Ur as early as 4000 BC. in acted. It was one of the trading products of the trade between Sumer, Dilmun and Meluhha. It was also very popular in ancient Egypt. For example, it was used for Tutankhamun's death mask. It was so in demand throughout the Middle East that it was in demand as early as the 13th century BC. imitations were made. From the city of Sidon, for example, roll seals of King Annipi and his father Adummu are known, which have been given a dark blue color with the help of cobalt salts. Lapis lazuli was also used in ground form as a blue dye (ultramarine), which was also very popular in Renaissance painting.


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